LOGEN

LOGEN is an offline partial evaluation system for Prolog written using the so called ”cogen approach”. Basically, the cogen is a system which: 1. based upon an annotated version of the program to be specialised produces a specialised partial evaluator for that program. This partial evaluator is called a generating extension. 2. the generating extension can be used to specialise the program in a very efficient manner. Try out Logen without having to install it on your machine by clicking on the picture above.


References in zbMATH (referenced in 11 articles , 1 standard article )

Showing results 1 to 11 of 11.
Sorted by year (citations)

  1. Vidal, Germán: A hybrid approach to conjunctive partial evaluation of logic programs (2011)
  2. Banda, Gourinath; Gallagher, John P.: Analysis of linear hybrid systems in CLP (2009)
  3. Barker, Steve; Leuschel, Michael; Varea, Mauricio: Efficient and flexible access control via Jones-optimal logic program specialisation (2008)
  4. Fischer, Sebastian; Silva, Josep; Tamarit, Salvador; Vidal, Germán: Preserving sharing in the partial evaluation of lazy functional programs (2008)
  5. Leuschel, Michael; Craig, Stephen-John; Elphick, Dan: Supervising offline partial evaluation of logic programs using online techniques (2007)
  6. Craig, Stephen-John; Gallagher, John P.; Leuschel, Michael; Henriksen, Kim S.: Fully automatic binding-time analysis for Prolog (2005)
  7. Craig, Stephen-John; Leuschel, Michael: LIX: an effective self-applicable partial evaluator for Prolog (2004)
  8. Leuschel, Michael; Craig, Stephen J.; Bruynooghe, Maurice; Vanhoof, Wim: Specialising interpreters using offline partial deduction (2004)
  9. Leuschel, Michael; Jørgensen, Jesper; Vanhoof, Wim; Bruynooghe, Maurice: Offline specialisation in Prolog using a hand-written compiler generator (2004)
  10. Leuschel, Michael; Massart, Thierry: Infinite state model checking by abstract interpretation and program specialisation (2000)
  11. Leuschel, Michael; Jørgensen, Jesper: Efficient specialisation in Prolog using the hand-written compiler generator LOGEN (1999)